Poem of the Day: La Pioggia nel Pineto (The Rain in the Pine Wood) by Gabriele d’Annunzio

Angel, would love to be sharing this morning rain with you right now!!! Missing you so very much!!! I love you to the moon and back!!!

Hush. On the threshold
of the forest I do not hear
words you call
human, but I hear
newer words
spoken by droplets and leaves
far away.

Listen. It rains
from the scattered clouds.
rains on the tamarisks
brackish and burned,
rains on the pines
scaly and spiky,

Rains on the myrtles
divine,
on the shining brooms
of clustered flowers,
on the junipers thick
with fragrant berries,

rains on our faces
sylvan,
rains on our hands
naked,
on our robes
light;

on the fresh thoughts
that the soul unfolds
newer,
on the beautiful fable
that yesterday
deceived you, that today deceives me,
Hermione.

Do you hear? Rain’s falling
on the solitary
greenery
with a crackle that stays
and varies in the air
according to the foliage
more sparse, less sparse.

Listen. An answer
to the weeping is the song
of cicadas
that the Southern wind weeping
does not frighten,
nor the ashen sky.

And the pine
has one sound, and the myrtle
another sound, and the juniper
still another, instruments
different
under countless fingers.

And immersed
we are in the spirit
of the forest
an arboreal life living;
and your drunken face
is tender with rain
as a leaf;

and your hair
is scented like
the bright broom flowers,
o earthly creature
who are named
Hermione.

Listen, listen. The accord
of aerial cicadas
little by little
duller
becomes under the weeping
that’s rising;

but a song mingles with it
hoarser
that from down there is rising,
from the damp distant shade.
Hoarser and weaker
it fades, disappears.

Only one note
still trembles, fades,
rises again, trembles, fades.
No voice of the sea is heard.

Now is heard all over the foliage
pelting
the silvery rain
that cleanses,
the pelting that varies
according to the foliage
thicker, less thick.

Listen.
The daughter of the air
is silent, but the daughter
of the silt faraway,
the frog,
is singing in the deepest shadow,
who knows where, who knows where!

And it rains on your eyelashes,
Hermione.
rains on your black eyelashes
so that it seems you’re weeping
but from pleasure; not white
but almost made green,
as coming out of the bark.

And all life is inside us fresh
scented,
heart in the breast is like a peach
untouched,
between the eyelids the eyes
are like springs among the grass,
the teeth in the sockets
are like unripe almonds.

And we go from thicket to thicket,
now joined now separate
(and the rough green vigor
interlaces our ankles
entangles our knees)
who knows where, who knows where!

And it rains on our faces
sylvan,
rains on our hands
naked,
on our robes
light,

on the fresh thoughts
that the soul unfolds
newer,
on the beautiful fable
that yesterday
deceived me, that today deceives you,
Hermione.

— Original —

Taci. Su le soglie
del bosco non odo
parole che dici
umane; ma odo
parole più nuove
che parlano gocciole e foglie
lontane.

Ascolta. Piove
dalle nuvole sparse.
Piove su le tamerici
salmastre ed arse,
piove su i pini
scagliosi ed irti,

piove su i mirti
divini,
su le ginestre fulgenti
di fiori accolti,
su i ginepri folti
di coccole aulenti,

piove su i nostri volti
silvani,
piove su le nostre mani
ignude,
su i nostri vestimenti
leggieri,

su i freschi pensieri
che l’anima schiude
novella,
su la favola bella
che ieri
t’illuse, che oggi m’illude,
Ermione.

Odi? La pioggia cade
su la solitaria
verdura
con un crepitío che dura
e varia nell’aria
secondo le fronde
più rade, men rade.

Ascolta. Risponde
al pianto il canto
delle cicale
che il pianto australe
non impaura,
nè il ciel cinerino.

E il pino
ha un suono, e il mirto
altro suono, e il ginepro
altro ancóra, stromenti
diversi
sotto innumerevoli dita.

E immersi
noi siam nello spirto
silvestre,
d’arborea vita viventi;
e il tuo volto ebro
è molle di pioggia
come una foglia,

e le tue chiome
auliscono come
le chiare ginestre,
o creatura terrestre
che hai nome
Ermione.

Ascolta, ascolta. L’accordo
delle aeree cicale
a poco a poco
più sordo
si fa sotto il pianto
che cresce;

ma un canto vi si mesce
più roco
che di laggiù sale,
dall’umida ombra remota.
Più sordo e più fioco
s’allenta, si spegne.

Sola una nota
ancor trema, si spegne,
risorge, trema, si spegne.
Non s’ode voce del mare.

Or s’ode su tutta la fronda
crosciare
l’argentea pioggia
che monda,
il croscio che varia
secondo la fronda
più folta, men folta.

Ascolta.
La figlia dell’aria
è muta; ma la figlia
del limo lontana,
la rana,
canta nell’ombra più fonda,
chi sa dove, chi sa dove!

E piove su le tue ciglia,
Ermione.
Piove su le tue ciglia nere
sì che par tu pianga
ma di piacere; non bianca
ma quasi fatta virente,
par da scorza tu esca.

E tutta la vita è in noi fresca
aulente,
il cuor nel petto è come pesca
intatta,
tra le pàlpebre gli occhi
son come polle tra l’erbe,
i denti negli alvèoli
son come mandorle acerbe.

E andiam di fratta in fratta,
or congiunti or disciolti
(e il verde vigor rude
ci allaccia i mallèoli
c’intrica i ginocchi)
chi sa dove, chi sa dove!

E piove su i nostri vólti
silvani,
piove su le nostre mani
ignude,
su i nostri vestimenti
leggieri,

su i freschi pensieri
che l’anima schiude
novella,
su la favola bella
che ieri
m’illuse, che oggi t’illude,
Ermione.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Good to Read / Poem of the Day and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s