Song of the Day: Break Up The Concrete by The Pretenders

Break Up the Concrete is the ninth studio album by rock group The Pretenders. It is their first studio album since Loose Screw in 2002.

Lyrics:

There was a red brick road where I grew up on
And a pretty stone wall round a fragrant lawn
Fish in the pond that sparkled in the dawn
But it ain’t no more it’s all gone gone gone

[Chorus]
Whoa!
Ram it! Cram it! Grand Slam it!
Break up the concrete, Break up the concrete
Prod it! Sod it! Metal Rod it!
Break up the concrete,
Thwak it! Crack it! Line back it!
Break up the concrete,
Shake it! Bake it! Earthquake it!
Break up the concrete

And the depot over there right next to the tracks
That the slaves put down, while breaking their backs
But those Texas zoo no would ever get into a carriage
Or anything that might lead to an interracial marriage

[Chorus]

Now don’t tell me its progress cause that’s just a lie
And don’t even try to come with an excuse why!
We we’re so busy worrying about them dropping the bomb
We didn’t notice where our enemy was really coming from!

Hey boys c’mon let’s do it!

Ram it! Cram it! Grand Slam it!!
Break up the concrete,
Prod it! Sod it! Metal Rod it!
Break up the concrete
Shake it! Bake it! Earthquake it!
Break up the concrete

Ram it! Slam it! Just cram it!
One more time!
Break up the concrete
Break up the concrete

Now he who laid it, come back here and raid it!

This song is a call to take on the physical decay of America. Frontwoman Chrissie Hynde told Rolling Stone magazine; “On our last tour I looked out a bus window and all I saw was concrete. For months, all I thought was ‘Break up the f–king concrete.'”
Break Up the Concrete was the ninth Pretenders studio album and their first to be recorded in its entirety in the United States. It was finished after just 12 days. 
The title song “Break Up the Concrete” was used in the opening scene of an episode of House M.D. (“5 to 9”, season 6, episode 14).
Break Up the Concrete was the first Pretenders album since 1994’s Last of the Independents not to feature Martin Chambers on drums. In an interview, Chrissie Hynde said that she was looking for a different style that she didn’t believe that Martin was capable of playing to her satisfaction. Session drummer Jim Keltnertook his place in the studio, although Chambers would return for the tour in support of the album.

The Pretenders

Origin Hereford, England, United Kingdom, and Akron, Ohio, United States
Genres Alternative rock, new wave, punk rock
Years active 1978–present
Labels Sire, Warner Bros.
Website thepretenders.com
Members Chrissie Hynde
Martin Chambers
Nick Wilkinson
James Walbourne
Eric Heywood
Past members James Honeyman-Scott
Pete Farndon
Robbie McIntosh
Malcolm Foster
Blair Cunningham
T.M. Stevens
Johnny Marr
Adam Seymour
Andy Rourke
Andy Hobson

image by tohdaryl

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