Song of the Day: The Viper and other Dixieland music

Dixieland music, sometimes referred to as Hot jazz or Early Jazz, is a style of jazz music which developed in New Orleans at the start of the 20th century, and was spread to Chicago and New York City by New Orleans bands in the 1910s.
Well-known jazz standard songs from the Dixieland era, such as “Basin Street Blues” and “When the Saints Go Marching In”, are known even to non-jazz fans. Beginning with Dixieland, Riverboat jazz and to Chicago-style jazz or hot jazz as developed by Louis Armstrong and others. Chicago-style jazz or hot jazz was also a transition and combination of 2-beat to 4-beat, introducing Swing in its earliest form.
Hot jazz or Chicago-style jazz was also the current original music that began the Lindy Hop dance craze as it developed in Harlem, NY.

The Viper

Muskrat Ramble

Tiger Rag

While the term Dixieland is still in wide use, the term’s appropriateness is a hotly debated topic in some circles. For some it is the preferred label (especially bands on the USA’s West coast and those influenced by the 1940s revival bands), while others would rather use terms like Classic jazz or Traditional jazz. Some of the latter consider Dixieland a derogatory term implying superficial hokum played without passion or deep understanding of the music and because “Dixie” is a reference to pre Civil War Southern States. Dixieland is often today applied to bands playing in a traditional style. Bands such as those of Eddie Condon and Muggsy Spanier were tagged with the Dixieland label.

File:BrianOConnell05.jpg

images by croonstreet / Infrogmation

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